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Posts for tag: oral hygiene

By Robert J Carpenter DDS
July 11, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   oral hygiene  

Oral HygieneMake sure that your daily oral routine is enough to prevent cavities and other problems.

A healthy smile shows. Luckily, anyone can practice simple, everyday measures that are designed to keep your smile feeling and looking its best. Our Sun Prairie, WI, dentist, Dr. Robert Carpenter, understands that life gets hectic sometimes, but maintaining good oral health should always be a top priority if you want to keep that smile for the rest of your life. How do you keep your smile healthy? Here’s how:

Brush Twice a Day

You would be surprised to discover just how many people don’t brush more than once a day; however, if you really want to remove plaque and prevent tartar buildup, then you need to brush first thing in the morning and again at night right before bedtime. This is the only way to keep plaque buildup down. Set a timer for 2 minutes and make sure you are brushing for at least that long.

Don’t Forget to Floss

You need to floss once a day to thoroughly remove plaque and food from between teeth. While a toothbrush is great for cleaning front, back, and chewing surfaces of teeth it won’t be able to thoroughly clean between teeth. This is a job for floss! Make sure to use a generous amount of floss each and every time (usually about 18 inches of floss). Wind it tightly around your fingers and gently move the floss back and forth between each tooth, sliding it up and down against the tooth to remove plaque. Remember to use a clean section of floss for each tooth.

Consider a Mouthwash

While there are some mouthwashes out there that only mask bad breath but don’t treat the source, our Sun Prairie general dentist can provide you with a proper mouth rinse that can reduce oral bacteria and plaque. This can be particularly helpful for children, teens, and adults who are at an increased risk for cavities and gum disease.

Avoid Sugar

As you already know, sugar negatively impacts the health of your smile and the more you consume the worse it can get. Those who eat a lot of sugar put themselves at a high risk for decay. To protect teeth from cavities stay away from sodas, fruit juices, sports drinks, and desserts. While sugar in moderation isn’t a bad thing, if you are someone who has an intense sweet tooth you could be doing your smile a great disservice.

Don’t let your oral health fall by the wayside. These are easy, everyday things you can do to keep your teeth and gums healthy. If it’s time to schedule a routine cleaning, or if you just have questions about the dentistry we offer here in Sun Prairie, WI, don’t hesitate to call us today to learn more about what we can do for you.

GrandpaKnowsBestHowKristiYamaguchiManagesHerKidsOralHealth

When Olympic figure skater Kristi Yamaguchi wanted to help her kids develop good oral health habits, the gold-medal-winner made good use of a family connection: Her father Jim Yamaguchi is a practicing dentist in the San Francisco Bay area who treats her entire brood. As she said in a recent interview, when she suspects the kids may be spending a little less effort on oral hygiene than they should, she playfully admonishes them: “You've got to brush your teeth better than that. Papa-san is going to know!”

Not all kids are lucky enough to have a grandpa who's a dentist — but every child can learn how to help take care of his or her oral health with age-appropriate techniques, plus plenty of parental guidance and encouragement. What's the best way to help your kids develop good oral hygiene routines? We're glad you asked!

Through babyhood and the toddler years, parents have the main responsibility for keeping kids' teeth clean. But as they begin to put away pacifiers and cease sucking thumbs — around ages 2 to 4 — children can also begin to help with their own oral hygiene routine. By then, kids will probably be used to the feel of gentle brushing, and may be eager to try it themselves.

A soft-bristled brush with a pea-sized dab of toothpaste is all they need to get started… along with a good dose of parental patience. Show them how to wiggle the brush back and forth from the gum line, and all around the upper and lower teeth, both in front and in back. At first, they will probably need plenty of help. But after the age of 6 or so, as their manual dexterity increases, so will their ability to get the job done.

You'll still have to check their work periodically — but you can also teach them how to do it on their own: Have your child run his or her tongue over the tooth surfaces. If they feel smooth and silky, they're probably clean too. If not… try, try again. This test is a good guideline to brushing effectiveness — but if you want to know for sure, use a temporary dye called a disclosing tablet (available at many drugstores) to reveal unseen buildups of plaque bacteria.

What else can you do to give your children the best chance at keeping a healthy mouth and sparkly teeth? Set a positive example! Make sure you (and your kids) eat a healthy diet, get moderate exercise, limit between-meal treats — and visit the dentist regularly. The encouragement you'll get after having a good dental checkup will make you feel like a gold medalist — even if the praise isn't coming from grandpa.

If you would like more information on how to help your child develop good oral health habits, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Dentistry & Oral Health For Children” and “How to Help Your Child Develop the Best Habits for Oral Health.”

By Robert J Carpenter DDS
November 27, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   oral hygiene  
HowtoInstillGoodOralHealthHabitsinChildren

Habits — both good and bad — often begin at an early age. They can be defined as recurring, mostly unconscious patterns of behavior, which are acquired by frequent repetition. Wouldn't it be nice if you could start your children off with good, healthy ones? When it comes to oral health, you can!

Practicing good oral hygiene is actually one of the easier habits to instill. The time to start is when your baby's teeth first begin to appear. To clean them, wipe gently with a clean, damp washcloth. Starting at age 2, when more teeth have appeared, you should establish a brushing routine using just a smear of fluoride toothpaste.

In the toddler years, a child-size soft toothbrush with a pea-sized dab of fluoride toothpaste will do the trick. By this time, they should have also put away their pacifiers and stopped sucking thumbs. Continual thumb-sucking past this age can lead to later problems with tooth and jaw development.

Kids soon get used to the feel of gentle brushing, and gradually begin taking over the job. However, they may need help until they're 6 or older, and have gained more manual dexterity. Don't forget to show them how to wiggle the brush back and forth along the gum line, as well as across the biting surfaces of the teeth.

You'll have to periodically confirm whether they did a good tooth-brushing job — but you can also teach them to check their own work. There are over-the-counter products that identify bacterial plaque by turning it a bright color, making it easy for you and your children to see how efficiently they have removed plaque. Another less precise way is to just have them run their tongue over their teeth: If the teeth feel nice and smooth, they're probably clean too. If not, it's back to the sink...

Eating healthy foods, getting moderate exercise, and avoiding sugary snacks between meals are a few more beneficial habits you can foster in your children. As parents, you can set a positive example by doing these things yourselves. The professionals in our office are ready to help you learn, practice and promote these healthy habits.

If you would like more information about instilling good oral health habits in your children, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How to Help Your Child Develop the Best Habits for Oral Health.”

By Robert J Carpenter DDS
October 18, 2013
Category: Oral Health
JohnLennonsToothSoldatAuctionfor31200

Lots of people collect Beatles memorabilia, but one Canadian dentist took this hobby to new heights recently when he paid $31,200 for John Lennon's molar at auction. According to published reports, Lennon had given the extracted tooth to his housekeeper as a souvenir in the 1960s after coming home from the dentist's office. The molar was discolored and had a cavity, according to the dentist who purchased it after the housekeeper's family put it up for bids. “For the cavity to be this large he probably wasn't seeing a dentist that regularly,” the dentist said. His brushing and flossing routine may not have been that conscientious either!

For healthy teeth, it's important to have a good daily oral hygiene routine at home and regular professional cleanings here at the office. Our hygienist will scale your teeth to remove hard deposits (tartar), and polish them to remove stains for a wonderful, extra-clean feeling.

Dental hygienists are trained to do lots of other things to promote your oral health besides cleaning your teeth. They can check the skin in and around your mouth looking for any suspicious bumps, sores, etc., that may need further evaluation. They will also evaluate your periodontal health (“peri” – around; “odont” – tooth), checking for signs of gum inflammation and bleeding (gingivitis). And they monitor teeth for signs of decay, which is actually the world's most widespread disease.

Cavities, or dental caries as it is also known, are the most notable consequences of tooth decay. Left untreated, caries can lead to pain and tooth loss. John Lennon's dentist must have believed there was nothing more to be done for the badly decayed molar that later went on to fetch such a high price.

Unless you're a rock star, your teeth are worth a lot more in a healthy and functioning state — inside your mouth! So if it's been a while since your last appointment, please come in and see us. Remember: Good dental health is priceless.

If you would like more information on tooth decay, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article, “Tooth Decay.” Dear Doctor also has more on the “Dental Hygiene Visit.”



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